Latest update: October 29, 2017

Human Learning in the Anthropocene

It took 13.82 billion years of evolution to get us where we are now in our particular corner of the universe . . .
 
. . . leaving us with an important question for our possible futures in the Anthropocene: Where do we go next?
 
Contents:
 
 
The project
 
Human Learning in the Anthropocene (HLA) is a new focus area of exploration, research, reflection and development in the Learning Development Institute. It comes in the wake of the Institute's prior major focus on Building the Scientific Mind (BtSM). HLA is not unrelated to BtSM, but it represents a wider and more acute focus.

The rationale behind HLA is complex. A growing body of scientific research suggests that it is time for humanity to stop doing business as usual. We are becoming painfully aware that there is something terribly wrong in the relationship between humans and their planetary environment. Nobel Laureate Paul Crutzen thus named our geological epoch Anthropocene. He did so for a reason, considering that we live in an era predominantly characterized by the significant, at times disastrous, impact of human activity on the environment. A cornucopia of serious problems is the result. Our cultural development has not kept pace with the astounding increase in what we know and are technically able to do. Consequently, humanity is in for a fundamental adjustment of its way of being in the world.

The problems we have to deal with in the Anthropocene are wicked and complex. They call for a different kind of human inhabitants of planet earth, i.e., culturally transformed members of our species who are able to think differently and take control of their behavior at a higher level of responsibility. Such cultural transformation calls for a different vision of what it means to learn and how we design for learning. While dealing with these issues we find ourselves still largely in terra incognita. Given this reality, HLA‘s attention goes in the first place to charting the terrain, to identifying and clarifying the major problems ahead and challenges to be met, and to figuring out what must be done. In this context, the HLA initiative aims at contributing to (1) a change in perceptions of human learning in ways that are relevant to the challenges of the Antropocene and (2) a change in attitudes and competencies in those involved in creating the conditions for learning in both informal and formal settings along the lifespan around the world. The focus of HLA is on knowing, as well as on doing, what must be done in the Anthropocene.

We welcome contact with researchers and designers for learning around the world interested in the above issues.
 
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Activities
 
Click on the links to find out more.
 
July 14-17, 2016: Presentation on 'Human Learning and the Development of Mind in the Anthropocene: Reflections against the Backdrop of Big History' at the Third Biennial Conference of the International Big History Association in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
 
September 6, 2016: Participation in round table on 'Bildung and Developmental Psychology' in Berlin, Germany.
 
October 17-21, 2016: Workshop + Presidential Panel Session on 'Designing for Human Learning in the Anthropocene'
 
March 14, 2017: Participation in round table on 'Bildung and Developmental Psychology' in Stockholm, Sweden. This is a follow-up round table to the one in Berlin mentioned above.
 
March 26, 2017: Lakeside Conversation on HLA issues
 
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Papers

Visser, J. (2016. Human Learning and the Development of Mind in the Anthropocene: Reflections against the Backdrop of Big History. Paper presented on July 15, 2016 at the third biennial conference of the International Big History Association, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, July 14 - 17, 2016. Click here for the published version of this paper in the October 2016 issue of Origins, Vol. VI, Nr. 9.

Visser, J. (2016) Slide series on Human Learning and the Development of Mind in the Anthropocene: Reflections against the Backdrop of Big History. Slides accompanying the above presentation at the third biennial conference of the International Big History Association, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, July 14 - 17, 2016.

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